NAGULESWARAM TEMPLE
 
  Is a very ancient temple believed to be one of the five Isvarams (divine residences) of the beginning of Shaivism.

This temple was built where the Sadhu Nagulaswami used to worship a lingam (usually an oblong shaped stone, representing the male attribute and seen also as a flame, symbol of life and creation. The lingam is often placed on a base, the yoni, which symbolizes the female).
 
 
Like many others in the region, the temple was destroyed during the Portuguese times and the present temple, well maintained and administered, dates from 1859. The main entrance faces east and in walking distance towards the northwest is Keerimalai Spring. Of interest inside the temple are the statues of the moorthies (deities) which adorn the sanctum.

A fifteen day festival is held in February-March which culminates with the Sivarathri (Shiva's night) for the revelation of the deities. Like Mavvidapuram, Naguleswaram is in the 'High Security Zone' and the access is restricted. From the main road, take the road on the left which is in front of Mavvidapuram Temple and drive 2.7 km. The temple will be on your left and the Keerimalai Spring slightly further on the right.
 
 
  The Springs of Keerimalai are said to be of therapeutic value, containing healing waters. The site itself is of historical and religious importance. From its source in the rocks of Tellipallai Mavvidapuram at an elevation of 10 metres, the spring waters flow through the crevices and fissures of the carbonated rocks encountering sea water as it emerges at Keerimalai. Its reputation for imparting therapeutic medicinal benefit to the human body comes from the fact that the spring waters whilst flowing through the fissures of the carbonated rocks acquire chemical values.

For the Hindus the springs are an important site and they gather here on the new moon day of July to dip into the sacred waters and for obeisance to the souls of their ancestors. The Magam day (auspicious day for Shiva) in February is also another important festival day.

Legend says that a Sadhu from India, Nagulaswami (`nagul' meaning mongoose in Sanskrit) came to bathe in the waters of this reputed spring after which his mongoose-like face turned into a human one. Thus the name of Keerimalai, 'keeri' - mongoose – and 'malai' - mound - in Tamil was given to the place.

Like the previous sites, the Keerimalai Spring is in the 'High Security Zone' and the access is restricted. It is very close to Naguleswaram, within walking distance.
enquiry Call Us: +94764228009 (WhatsApp/Viber)
enquiry Email: info@srilankaheritages.net
enquiry Skype: srilankaheritages
enquiry Quick Browsing
ACTIVITIES
Activities
AYURVEDA & MEDITATIONS
Ayurveda & Meditations
NATURE
Nature
HERITAGE
Heritage Sites
ARTICLES & SPEECHES
Speeches & Articles
TOWNS IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER
Towns in Alphabetical Order
TRAVEL AGENTS HOTELS
Travel Agents Hotels
SACRED DESTINATIONS
Sared Destinations
LIST OF BEACHES
List of Beaches
GREATNESS OF SRI LANKA
List of Beaches
OLDEST HUMAN FOUND IN SRI LANKA
Oldest Human found in Sri Lanka